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Fiction

deeperstateofmind:

sweet-plush-rump:

mischiefinthesnow:

jaclcfrost:

do you ever take a minute to appreciate the frost on windows and whatnot

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like

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do you ever stop to look at this like really look at it

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before it melts or you defrost your car so you can see out the windows

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i mean look at this shit it’s straight up artwork

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artwork that melts

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“You are all welcome.” 

Why is there an empty picture gif thing cmon man

DON’T YOU DARE

19 Jul 2014 137071 Notes Reblog
19 Jul 2014
12688 Notes
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"Being entirely honest with oneself is a good exercise."
— Sigmund Freud, “Letter to Wilhelm Fliess,” 15 Oct 1897 (via wordsnquotes)
19 Jul 2014 621 Notes Reblog
19 Jul 2014
227 Notes
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itinsightus:

Next floor: Middle Age by cyrilfontaine2

19 Jul 2014
291 Notes
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19 Jul 2014
700 Notes
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antsintheafterbirth:

vdjango:

Monks’ corridor at the Capuchins’ Catacombs, Italy
19 Jul 2014
1057 Notes
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paxmachina:

Onna Bugeisha (Feudal Japan Female Samurai)

Rare vintage photograph of an Onna-Bugeisha, one of the female warriors of the upper social classes in feudal Japan (emerged before Samurai)

An onna-bugeisha (女武芸者?) was a type of female warrior belonging to the Japanese upper class. Many wives, widows, daughters, and rebels answered the call of duty by engaging in battle, commonly alongside samurai men. They were members of the bushi (samurai) class in feudal Japan and were trained in the use of weapons to protect their household, family, and honor in times of war. They also represented a divergence from the traditional “housewife” role of the Japanese woman. They are sometimes mistakenly referred to as female samurai, although this is an oversimplification. Onna bugeisha were very important people in ancient Japan. Significant icons such as Empress Jingu, Tomoe Gozen, Nakano Takeko, and Hōjō Masako were all onna bugeisha who came to have a significant impact on Japan.

19 Jul 2014
53 Notes
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